Newsletters Archive - 2008

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  Snapshot Database - (Producing DBA Reports in HTML) — (18-April-2008)

DBA's rely on Oracle's data dictionary views and dynamic performance views in 
order to support and better manage their databases. Although these views 
provide a simple and easy mechanism to query critical information regarding the 
database, it helps to have a collection of accurate and readily available SQL 
scripts to query these views.

Over the years, I have published a vast array of Oracle DBA scripts that can be 
used to manage many aspects of the database including space management, 
performance, backups, security, and session management. Once the scripts have 
been put in place, they can be easily run from within SQL*Plus while logged in 
as a DBA user.

The following article provides a new approach to SQL scripting that allows the 
Oracle DBA to collect a wide array of metrics and statistics using a single 
script. This "Snapshot Database" script will contain a collection of useful 
queries that run as a whole and produce an eye-catching HTML report. The report 
will contain critical database information including installed options, 
storage, performance data, and security.

The featured "Snapshot Database" article is available at:

http://www.idevelopment.info/data/Oracle/DBA_tips/Database_Administration/DBA_50.shtml

Currently, I have three separate Snapshot Database scripts available for each 
major Oracle release (8i, 9i, and 10g). The release for Oracle Database 11g 
will be released soon.

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  Removing a Node from an Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 Cluster on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI) — (04-March-2008)

Although not as exciting as building an Oracle RAC or adding a new node and 
instance to a clustered database; removing a node from a clustered environment 
is just as important to understand for a DBA managing Oracle RAC 10g. While it 
is true that most of the attention in a clustered database environment is 
focused on extending the database tier to support increased demand, the exact 
opposite is just as likely to be encountered where the DBA needs to remove a 
node from an existing RAC environment. It may be that a server is being 
underutilized in the database cluster and could be better served in another 
business unit. Another scenario is a node failure. In this case, a node can be 
removed from the cluster while the remaining nodes continue to service ongoing 
requests.

I recently published an extension to two of my articles:

"Building an Inexpensive Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI)"

and

"Adding a Node to an Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 Cluster on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI)"

Contained in this new article are the steps required to remove a single node 
from an already running and configured three-node Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 
environment on the CentOS 32-bit (x86) platform. The node being removed is the 
third node I added in the second article. Although this article was written and 
tested on CentOS 4.5 Linux, it should work unchanged with Red Hat Enterprise 
Linux 4 Update 5.

The new article can be accessed using the following link:

Removing a Node from an Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 Cluster on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI)

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  Adding a Node to an Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 Cluster on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI) — (26-February-2008)

As your organization grows so too does your need for more application and 
database resources to support the company's IT systems. Oracle RAC 10g 
provides a scalable framework which allows DBA's to effortlessly extend the 
database tier to support this increased demand. As the number of users and 
transactions increase, additional Oracle instances can be added to the Oracle 
database cluster to distribute the extra load.

I recently published an extension to my article 
"Building an Inexpensive Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI)". 
Contained in this new article are the steps required to add a single node to an 
already running and configured two-node Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 environment on 
the CentOS 32-bit (x86) platform. Although this article was written and tested on 
CentOS 4.5 Linux, it should work unchanged with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 
Update 5.

The new article can be accessed using the following link:

Adding a Node to an Oracle RAC 10g Release 2 Cluster on Linux - (CentOS 4.5 / iSCSI)

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  New Oracle Data Pump Scripts — (21-February-2008)

Oracle Database 10g users (and higher) should consider using the new Data Pump 
utility in place of the original Oracle import/export. The original export 
utility was deprecated in Oracle Database 10g Release 2, and is no longer 
supported for general use as of Oracle Database 11g. Going forward, Data Pump 
export (expdp) will be the sole supported means of exporting data from the 
database. The original import utility (imp) still ships with Oracle Database 
10g and Oracle Database 11g in order to support import of legacy dump files. 
The original import utility will be supported forever and will provide the 
means to import dump files from earlier releases (release 5.0 and later) that 
were created with the original export (exp). Please note that the original 
export dump files and the new Data Pump dump files are "not" compatible. You 
cannot read an original Oracle export dump file with Data Pump and vice versa. 
Neither client can read dump files created by the other.

Provided below are links to several shell scripts I wrote for both Unix and 
Microsoft Windows to perform a logical backup of an Oracle database using the 
new Data Pump feature as well as the original export utility. Note that Data 
Pump was first introduced in Oracle 10g which means that the Data Pump scripts 
will only work with Oracle Database 10g or higher. By default, these scripts 
perform a full and consistent backup of the database using a dynamically 
created parameter file that gets written to a temporary directory and run 
through the export utility using the "parfile" parameter.


Unix

dpump_backup_full.ksh - (Data Pump)
export_backup_full.ksh - (Original Export)


Microsoft Windows

dpump_backup_full.bat - (Data Pump)
export_backup_full.bat - (Original Export)


These shell scripts as well as many others are also included in the following 
Oracle DBA Scripts package:

dba_scripts_archive_Oracle.zip - (ZIP format)

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  Connecting to ASM through the TNS Listener from a Client Desktop — (29-January-2008)

By default, the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) does not 
configure the TNS listener to accept client requests to an ASM instance running 
from a different node. Access will be denied for clients like SQL*Plus, 
Perl DBI:DBD, and JDBC when attempting to connect to an ASM instance from a 
node other than the node running the ASM instance. When the service is created 
for an ASM instance, its status is BLOCKED:

[oracle@linux1 ~]$ lsnrctl status LISTENER_LINUX1 | grep ASM
Service "+ASM" has 1 instance(s).
  Instance "+ASM1", status BLOCKED, has 1 handler(s) for this service...
Service "+ASM_XPT" has 1 instance(s).
  Instance "+ASM1", status BLOCKED, has 1 handler(s) for this service...

This limitation puts restrictions on scripts and other client tools that want 
to monitor and manage an ASM instance from a different node. Getting around 
this restriction however is an easy task that involves manually creating a 
service name for the ASM instance.

The following article presents the steps required to access an ASM instance 
through the TNS listener from a client desktop. The database used in this 
article is a two-node Oracle RAC 10g clustered database where in fact there 
will two ASM instances (one ASM instance for each Oracle instance in the 
cluster). The database version is Oracle 10g Release 2 (10.2.0.3.0) running on 
CentOS 4.5 (or RHEL 4.5):

Connecting to ASM through the TNS Listener from a Client Desktop

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  Installing Oracle Database 11g Release 1 on Linux - (RHEL 5) — (17-January-2008)

I recently published a comprehensive article on installing Oracle Database 11g 
Release 1 on Linux - (CentOS 5.1). This article should also work unchanged with 
the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.1.

Included in the article are detailed instructions for installing and configuring 
the Linux operating system to host the Oracle Database 11g Release 1 software and 
database. I also incorporated many tips that go beyond just simply installing 
the software to help newcomers to Oracle Database 11g better manage their 
database environment.

The new article can be found at:

Installing Oracle Database 11g Release 1 on Linux - (RHEL 5)

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  Installing Oracle Database 10g Release 2 on Linux - (RHEL 5) — (09-January-2008)

I recently published a comprehensive article on installing Oracle Database 10g 
Release 2 on Linux - (CentOS 5.1). This article should also work unchanged with 
the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.1.

Included in the article are detailed instructions for installing and configuring 
the Linux operating system to host the Oracle Database 10g Release 2 software and 
database. I also incorporated many tips that go beyond just simply installing  
the software to help newcomers to Oracle Database 10g better manage their 
database environment.

The new article can be found at:

Installing Oracle Database 10g Release 2 on Linux - (RHEL 5)

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------


  Oracle RAC 11g Release 1 / iSCSI / CentOS 5.1 — (03-January-2008)

First, I would like to wish everyone a Happy New Year!

This week I published the latest in a series of articles on how to build an 
inexpensive Oracle RAC system. This article focuses on Oracle's newest 
release — Oracle 11g Release 1 (11.1.0.6.0) as well as the latest version of 
CentOS (version 5.1).

As with its predecessor, this article provides detailed instructions on how to 
build a two-node Oracle RAC system using low cost hardware and freely available 
software. A network storage server will be built using Openfiler and iSCSI 
technology which will be used for all shared storage requirements. Powered by 
rPath Linux, Openfiler is a free browser-based network storage management 
utility that delivers file-based Network Attached Storage (NAS) and block-based 
Storage Area Networking (SAN) in a single framework. Openfiler supports CIFS, 
NFS, HTTP/DAV, FTP, however, I will only be making use of its iSCSI 
capabilities to implement an inexpensive SAN for the shared storage component 
required by Oracle RAC 11g.

The newly updated Oracle RAC 11g / iSCSI article can be found at:

Building an Inexpensive Oracle RAC 11g Release 1 on Linux - (CentOS 5.1 / iSCSI)

----------------------------
Jeffrey M. Hunter
Sr. Database Administrator
jhunter@idevelopment.info
http://www.idevelopment.info
----------------------------